Resources

Lake Michigan and the Great Lakes have a wealth of projects, research and groups working to improve environmental quality.

Areas of Concern

Ut nec odio a ligula commodo posuere. Duis id elit lorem. Sed fermentum diam nec diam mollis egestas in nec libero. In at tristique eros. Etiam pulvinar venenatis nulla et iaculis. Phasellus placerat tempus ullamcorper. Mauris orci eros, condimentum eget ultrices tempus, posuere at quam. Suspendisse id mollis sem. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nullam vehicula nisi quis erat rhoncus eu sollicitudin justo rutrum.

Biodiversity

Lake Michigan Biodiversity Conservation Strategy - The Nature Conservancy and Michigan Natural Features Inventory, working with a broad network of scientists, natural resource professionals, agency staff, and non-profit colleagues, will articulate action agendas for the rehabilitation, restoration, and conservation of the native biodiversity and ecosystem function of Great Lakes Erie and Michigan.

Biological diversity

Ut nec odio a ligula commodo posuere. Duis id elit lorem. Sed fermentum diam nec diam mollis egestas in nec libero. In at tristique eros. Etiam pulvinar venenatis nulla et iaculis. Phasellus placerat tempus ullamcorper. Mauris orci eros, condimentum eget ultrices tempus, posuere at quam. Suspendisse id mollis sem. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nullam vehicula nisi quis erat rhoncus eu sollicitudin justo rutrum.

Climate Adaptation Tools

The changing climate impacts society and ecosystems in a broad variety of ways. For example climate change can increase or decrease rainfall, influence agricultural crop yields, affect human health, cause changes to forests and other ecosystems, or even impact our energy supply. Climate-related impacts are occurring across regions of the country and across many sectors of our economy. Many state and local governments are already preparing for the impacts of climate change through "adaptation," which is planning for the changes that are expected to occur.

Education Materials

Below are resources to help citizens, community leaders and children better understand the ecology of Lake Michigan.

Energy

Energy and water are intertwined. Producing energy uses water, and providing freshwater uses energy. Both these processes face growing limits and problems.  The following section highlights available resources that address the linkages between energy and water.

Harbors, Marinas & Ports

Over the last few years, there has been growing awareness of the environmental impacts of the maritime industry from environmental organizations, local governments, media, and the industry’s customers. However, the role of the maritime industry, particularly harbors, marinas, ports and terminal operators, in reducing pollution and improving environmental quality is relatively unexplored. Harbors, marinas and ports have a unique position between land and water, government and industry, public and private, and economic and environmental issues, which could be a powerful catalyst in reducing pollution and improving environmental quality and economic growth around Lake Michigan.

Invasive Species

Invasive species (also called "non-indigenous" or "non-native") are introduced species that adversely affect the habitats and bio-regions economically, environmentally, and/or ecologically. Such invasive species may be either plants or animals and may disrupt by dominating a region, wilderness areas, particular habitats, or wildland-urban interface land from loss of natural controls (such as predators or herbivores). This includes non-native invasive plant species labeled as exotic pest plants and invasive exotics growing in native plant communities.

Pollution Prevention

Pollution prevention (P2) is reducing or eliminating waste at the source by modifying production processes, promoting the use of non-toxic or less-toxic substances, implementing conservation techniques, and re-using materials rather than putting them into the waste stream.

Toxics

Toxic chemical pollution threatens every American family and every community. Reducing exposure to hazardous substances protects families and wildlife, and improves our water quality and neighborhoods. 

Water Quality

Water quality refers to the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of water.  It is a measure of the condition of water relative to the requirements of one or more biotic species and or to any human need or purpose.  It is most frequently used by reference to a set of standards against which compliance can be assessed. The most common standards used to assess water quality relate to health of ecosystems, safety of human contact and drinking water.

Watershed Management

Watershed management is the study of the relevant characteristics of a watershed aimed at the sustainable distribution of its resources and the process of creating and implementing plans, programs, and projects to sustain and enhance watershed functions that affect the plant, animal, and human communities within a watershed boundary.  Features of a watershed that agencies seek to manage include water supply, water quality, drainage, stormwater runoff, water rights, and the overall planning and utilization of watersheds. Landowners, land use agencies, stormwater management experts, environmental specialists, water use surveyors and communities all play an integral part in the management of a watershed.


News Feed

Call for Abstracts and Poster Presentations

2013-04-26
The 8th biennial State of Lake Michigan and 13th annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference are now accepting abstracts for consideration.

Great Lakes lawmakers consider statewide bans on pavement sealants

2012-12-12
Legislators in at least three Great Lakes states are proposing statewide bans of certain pavement sealants that have killed aquatic animals and are considered a possible health risk to humans.

Office of the Great Lakes has released the 2012 Michigan Water Conservation and Efficiency Program Review

2012-12-12
The Office of the Great Lakes has released the 2012 Michigan Water Conservation and Efficiency Program Review, which assesses Michigan’s progress in meeting its obligations under the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact.

Focus Area 2 Aquatic Pathways Summary Report

2012-09-18
Army Corps releases Focus Area 2 Aquatic Pathways Summary Report, solicits public comment

IJC: Taking A New Approach to Managing the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River

2012-02-14
IJC proposes new approach to managing levels and flows in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence Riverwith the assistance of a Working Group of representatives from Canada, the United States, the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and the State of New York.